Across the country, fast food workers serving up successes

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SERVING UP FAIRNESS: Fast food workers in St. Louis and across the country are winning concessions in their fight for a living wage and the right to form a union without retaliation. – Labor Tribune photo
SERVING UP FAIRNESS: Fast food workers in St. Louis and across the country are winning concessions in their fight for a living wage and the right to form a union without retaliation.
– Labor Tribune photo

Fast Food Workers’ Successes, Part 2

Last week the Labor Tribune examined the progress of Show Me 15, the area coalition of fast food workers fighting for a living wage and the right to form a union without retaliation.

Some of their victories have included individual raises, securing the right to organize and removal of abusive managers.

This week, we look at some of the national victories of the fast food workers’ movement.

CONNECTICUT

• Workers at a Burger King in Windsor Locks won paid sick days after confronting management about why they weren't getting them.

• Workers at a Dunkin Donuts in Hartford won raises up to 50 cents after going on strike.

• Workers and community members marched on a Subway, winning back the job of a striking worker who was unfairly fired.

FLORIDA

• A Miami Burger King worker who led a wage theft protest got hours got bumped to full-time from part-time hours.

ILLINOIS

• Workers at Snarf's, a Chicago sandwich shop, who were fired three days before Christmas, reached a settlement with the company to get their jobs back and one month's pay.

• McDonald's workers in three Chicago area stores with the same owner delivered a petition to management in March demanding respect. Two weeks later, the workers all got raises averaging 50 cents.

• After a Chicago McDonald's manager posted a letter telling workers that they needed to re-verify their documents – putting undocumented workers in jeopardy – workers organized an action calling out management for violating the law. Management took down the posting and no workers were required to re-verify their documents.

• Workers at the Rock & Roll McDonalds in Chicago marched and held a press conference calling out a verbally abusive manager. Following the action and media attention, management disciplined the manager, who now says “please” and “thank you” to the employees.

NEW YORK

• Workers at a Domino's at 736 W. 181st in New York City walked off their jobs for four days, backed by community members and local elected officials, to protest against wage theft.

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman intervened, reaching settlements with Domino’s, McDonald’s and other fast-food companies and winning more than $1 million in back pay for the workers.

• Washington Heights McDonald's workers got a new air conditioner after a co-worker fainted and workers walked off the job on the hottest day of the summer last July.

• A Wendy's worker who was fired got her job back after New York City Council Member Jumaane Williams led an occupation of the store and negotiated her return with the manager.

NORTH CAROLINA

• Coworkers and community members in Greensboro protested and threatened to file an EEOC complaint after a Wendy’s worker was taken off the schedule for four weeks for wearing dreadlocks. He won four weeks back-pay and his job back.

• A McDonalds worker in Williamston won back pay and her job back after community members confronted management about her unfair firing.

SOUTH CAROLINA

• After workers complained of Charleston store managers trying to intimidate them to prevent them from striking, a district manager visited her stores and informed workers it was their right and decision to go on strike.

WISCONSIN

• Three wrongly fired Milwaukee Burger King workers were rehired with back pay after they marched in protest.

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