IBEW 1 journeywoman’s love of career steers daughter to take same path

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By SHERI GASSAWAY
Correspondent

FOLLOWING IN HER FOOTSTEPS: Trinity Martinez (left) says her mom (right) Aly’s success as an IBEW Local 1 journeywoman and her love of her career prompted her to join the IBEW Local 1 apprenticeship program.     – Photo courtesy of Aly Martinez
ALY MARTINEZ, a night instructor at the IBEW/NECA Electrical Industry Training Center, teaches apprentice Jacob Callahan about three-bend saddles. – Photo courtesy of Aly Martinez

About 10 years ago, Aly Martinez found herself back in the job market after going through a divorce. But without a college degree, her options were limited.

A friend’s brother suggested she consider an “unconventional” career  in the trades. Growing up, Aly often went on side jobs with her dad and learned how to use tools.

After doing some research, she applied for an apprenticeship at IBEW Local 613 in Atlanta and was accepted into the program.

‘ENJOY MY WORK’
“I was pretty handy around the house, but I never thought I would get into a career like this,” Aly said. “To be honest, I was afraid of working in the electrical industry. But once I got into the program, I was just amazed. I really enjoy my work.”

In 2014, Aly moved to the St. Louis area and joined IBEW Local 1. Today, she’s a night instructor at the IBEW/NECA Electrical Industry Training Center and teaches conduit bending.

TRINITY MARTINEZ, who joined IBEW Local 1 in November 2019, says she loves her career and the brotherhood that comes along with it. “Some of the best people you meet are those working with you on the jobsite.” – Photo courtesy of Aly Martinez

FOLLOWING IN HER FOOTSTEPS
In 2019, Aly’s daughter Trinity was accepted into the IBEW Local 1 apprenticeship program. She says her mom’s success as a union electrician and love of her career prompted her to follow in her mom’s footsteps.

“I know if I put in the time, I’ll be making good money and have good benefits,” she said. “Plus, it’s a lot of fun, and I love the brotherhood. Some of the best people you meet are those working with you on the jobsite.”

‘YOU CAN DO IT’
Aly and her daughter both have the same advice for women considering careers in the trades: “You can do it.”

And to help spread that message, Aly has joined the executive board of Missouri Women in Trades (MOWIT), a non-profit organization dedicated to helping women enter and succeed in careers in the union building trades.

ABOUT MOWIT
MOWIT provides mentoring, support group meetings, job information and referrals. For more information, visit mowit.org.


1 COMMENT

  1. I have a pretty cool and similar story. After a fight against cancer coming back to the workforce was not as I expected. It was talking too long to get an interview for office jobs which I had been convinced was all I could do. My then husband told me uy would be easier to just going the trade in a jokingly way. He was a 5th year apprentice at IBEW local 20. I walked in and had a job the same day. Fast Fwd 10 years and my oldest daughter is taking the steps necessary to get accepted into INEW L.U 617 since we’ve relocated to California. One of the many benefits of the trade and union is the ability to travel. My now 10 year old daughter at kinder graduation announced she too wants to be an Electrician. My Father is a JIW and it seems to run in the family.

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