Living in RTW states is more dangerous for everyone, but especially students

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SCHOOL SAFETY and overall crime rates are worse in RTW states. Prop A (RTW) in Missouri would make that worse here. Vote NO on Prop A on Aug. 7. – Getty Images photo

Two more critical reasons we don’t want RTW in Missouri; vote ‘NO’
on Prop A on Aug. 7

By ED FINKELSTEIN
Publisher

In light of the crime rate generally, and school shootings in particular, safety is a major concern for everyone today. Safety for ourselves and our families. And, especially, the safety of our children at school.

As part of the Labor Tribune’s ongoing series on “right-to-work” (RTW), we looked at public safety in RTW vs. non-RTW states, and results were predictably terrible.

In RTW states, where tax revenue is lower and economic desperation is higher, safety for individuals, and for our school children and staff, is far worse than in states without this terrible law, highlighting yet another reason to Vote NO on Prop A on Aug. 7.

Looking at two key indicators –  Overall Safest States and Overall Safest Public High School systems in America – living in a RTW state is more dangerous than in states without this terrible anti-family, anti-worker law.

Here are the harsh facts comparing the 25 WORST and the 25 BEST states in each category:

INDIVIDUAL, FAMILY SAFETY

WORST STATES

• RTW In 19 of the 25 worst states for public safety, 76 percent are RTW, providing LESS security for everyone.

• WITHOUT RTW Only six of the 25 worst states (24 percent) are without a RTW law.

BEST STATES

• WITHOUT RTW 17 of the 25 best states (68 percent) have NO RTW law allowing for greater overall family and individual safety.

• RTWOnly eight of the 25 best states (32 percent) are RTW states.

Missouri ranks 46th worst of the 50 states for individual and family safety, and 5th worst in the 25 worst states. RTW will make this situation worse.

SAFETY IN PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS

WORST STATES

• RTW In 16 of the 25 worst states (64 percent) risk for children’s safety is greater.

• WITHOUT RTW Only nine of the 25 worst states (36 percent) are without a RTW law.

BEST STATES

• WITHOUT RTW14 of the 25 best states (56 percent) that have NO RTW law provide greater economic stability and safety protections for individuals and school children.

• RTW Only 11 of the 25 best states (44 percent) are RTW states.

Missouri ranks 35th worst of the 50 states for safety in public high schools, and 16th worst in the 25 worst states. Again, RTW will make this situation worse.

STUDY METRICS

These conclusions were reached by overlaying the rankings of Best and Worst states from the financial services company WalletHub to the nation’s RTW and non-RTW states. The WalletHub study did not attempt to draw a comparison between RTW and non-RTW states, eliminating the potential for bias.

• For the study of Public School safety in the states, 21 relevant metrics were measured in two categories: (1) Quality and (2) Safety. Among the metrics used were threatened/injured students; not attending school due to safety concerns; access to illegal drugs; participation in violence; armed students; bullying; and disciplinary and incarceration rates.

• For the study of a state’s Overall Safety, the research used 48 key safety indicators grouped into five different categories: (1) Personal & Residential Safety, (2) Financial Safety, (3) Road Safety, (4) Workplace Safety and (5) Emergency Preparedness.

STUDY SOURCES

WalletHub, based in Washington, DC, conducts the studies that offer insights on a diverse variety of community of subjects. Its data and charts are frequently referenced in news articles appearing in Bloomberg News, The Wall Street Journal, Fox News, USA Today, Forbes, Yahoo, St. Louis Post-Dispatch and The New York Times.

• Overall Safety sources: the U.S. Census Bureau, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Federal Bureau of Investigation, TransUnion, National Center for Missing & Exploited Children, U.S. Fire Administration, Administration for Community Living - AGing Integrated Database, United Health Foundation, Federal Trade Commission, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, U.S. Department of Labor - Employment and Training Administration, Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, The Road Information Program, Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety, U.S. Department of Labor - Occupational Safety and Health Administration, National Centers for Environmental Information, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, FINRA Investor Education Foundation, Wm. Robert Johnston, Gun Violence Archive, Southern Poverty Law Center, National Sheriffs’ Association, Renwood RealtyTrac, Zillow and EverQuote.

• Safest Schools sources: the U.S. Census Bureau, National Center for Educational Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, U.S. News & World Report, College Board and ACT.

VOTE ‘NO’ ON PROP A

Missourians will have a chance August 7 to defeat RTW by voting NO on PROP A, sending a clear message to Missouri lawmakers that we don’t want to join the ranks of Mississippi, Alabama, Arkansas and other states where working people can’t earn a fair return on their work and the wealthiest 1% and their corporate lobbyists use this anti-worker law to enrich themselves and the expense of workers and working families.

Protect your pay, vote NO on Prop A.

See previous Why Vote No on Prop A stories:

Part 8. Children’s education in RTW states stinks

         Part 9. For Millennials, RTW is an albatross to their future hopes of living the American Dream

 

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