McDonald’s to workers: ‘Quit complaining’

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McNONSENSE: A screencap from a video from Fast Food Forward posted on LowPayIsNotOK.org ridiculing McDonald’s for it’s latest offensive advice for low-wage workers on its McResource help line. Among the tips: Quit complaining to reduce stress.
McNONSENSE: A screencap from a video from Fast Food Forward posted on LowPayIsNotOK.org ridiculing McDonald’s for it’s latest offensive advice for low-wage workers on its McResource help line. Among the tips: Quit complaining to reduce stress.

Ronald McDonald feels his workers’ pain.

He hears his workers’ complaints about low wages and lack of respect on the job, and he wishes they’d shut-up about it – for their own good.

McDonald’s “McResource Line” (the same website and help line that encourages workers to seek out public assistance to help meet the ends that their paychecks won’t) is full of helpful tips for low-wage workers to relieve stress, feel fuller on less food and stay healthy.

Unhappy with your job? Well, don’t complain about it, McResource says,  “stress hormone levels rise by 15 percent after 10 minutes of complaining."

Seriously, this is McDonald’s idea of helping its employees.

A new video from Fast Food Forward, an advocacy group for low-wage fast food workers, spells it all out. See the video here: http://lowpayisnotok.org/mcresources/.

Here are some of the nuggets of advice:

• Now that the holidays are near, McResource offers the helpful advice that workers should return their unopened Christmas gifts or sell their unwanted possessions on eBay or CraigsList for some quick cash.

• Can’t afford a Thanksgiving dinner? Here’s some advice: “Breaking food into pieces often results in eating less and still feeling full.” Earning paychecks that would allow workers to buy groceries for their families might help too.

• Want to avoid a heart attack?  McResource suggests taking “two vacations a year to cut attack risk by 50 percent.” That could be tough for workers who followed the McResource suggestion elsewhere on the site to help boost income by taking a second job.

If all of this makes your blood boil, McResource has an answer for that, too – sing away your stress. “Singing along to your favorite songs can lower your blood pressure,” the website suggests.

LEARN MORE, HELP

Low-wage fast food jobs cost Americans nearly $7 billion every year in public assistance programs many workers rely on to make ends meet because their jobs don’t pay enough.

In St. Louis, the STL Can’t Survive on 7.35 Campaign has been actively protesting for higher wages and the right to form a union since May. In August, fast-food workers in 60 cities across the country went on strike, calling for higher wages, so they don’t have to rely on public assistance programs to get by.

The Service Employees International Union (SEIU) is providing financial and technical support to the campaigns throughout the country and is lending staff to help train organizers on the ground.

You can find out more and help fast food workers in the St. Louis area fight for a living wage by going to STL735.org, following #STL735 on Twitter, or liking facebook.com/STL735.

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